In 2011, solar power reached a tipping point.

The scientists found that, from 1975 up to 2011, solar panels were actually a source of greenhouse gases globally. The emissions avoided by existing solar panels were insufficient to offset the amount of emissions being produced by the rapid production of new solar panels.

But in 2011, this flipped. Instead of being a net source of emissions, the solar industry started avoiding more emissions than it emitted, providing a net climate benefit. Continue reading

November Reading List

  1. Fracking could carry unforeseen risks as thalidomide and asbestos did, says report 
  2. This headline will subtly mislead you and science says that probably matters
  3. 5 Key Takeaways From the Latest Climate Change Report
  4. Why Ebola hit West Africa hard
  5. Nuclear Arms Control in China Today
  6. Texas oil town makes history as residents say no to fracking 
  7. The secular stagnation hoax
  8. The Pentagon’s Arguments for Runaway Arms Trading Are Indefensible
  9. World’s first solar cycle lane opening in the Netherlands
  10. Raytheon acquires cyber firm for $420 million
  11. America’s New Mercenaries
  12. What’s the environmental impact of modern war?
  13. Petraeus joins pro-fracking choir at Harvard’s Belfer Center
  14. Stakes are high as US plays the oil card against Iran and Russia
  15. Foundation of US nuclear system showing cracks
  16. Midterms 2014: The Red Wedding for Democrats
  17. Can (green) energy policy create jobs?
  18. Death Wears Bunny Slippers
  19. It is the 0.01% who are really getting ahead in America
  20. The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership and UK healthcare
  21. Is neoliberalism at last unravelling in Britain?
  22. For Whom the Wall Fell? A balance-sheet of transition to capitalism 
  23. Ministers’ shale gas ‘hype’ attacked
  24. Some Very Initial Thoughts on the US-China Deal
  25. The social, political and ecological pathologies of the Ebola Crisis cannot be ignored
  26. F’d: How the U.S. and Its Allies Got Stuck with the World’s Worst New Warplane
  27. Spied on by BP
  28. How did the first world war actually end?
  29. Don’t Throw Billions at an Obsolete Nuclear Arsenal
  30. Hard Evidence: are we facing another financial crisis? 
  31. Growth: the destructive god that can never be appeased
  32. Cameron is right to warn of another recession, but wrong to blame the world
  33. The Top 5 Foreign Policy Lessons of the Past 20 Years
  34. The .01 Percent Blow Their Fortunes on Yachts, Personal Jets and America’s Politicians
  35. How much is owed to Gaza? Does anyone know? This is not a rhetorical question. I’m really asking!
  36. International arms firm Lockheed Martin in the frame for £1bn NHS contract 
  37. We Love the Pentagon’s ‘Encyclopedia of Ethical Failure’
  38. Massive Rail Deal Gives China’s Push Into Africa a Major Win
  39. Exaggeration Nation
  40. Barclays boycotted over Israel arms trade shares
  41. Firms invested £17bn in companies making cluster bombs, report says
  42. There is Nothing Natural about Gentrification
  43. 41 men targeted but 1,147 people killed: US drone strikes – the facts on the ground 
  44. The ‘crass insensitivity’ of Tower’s luxury dinner for arms dealers, days after poppy display 
  45. Fracking firm’s plans to look for gas in North Yorkshire criticised by environmental groups
  46. House Republicans just passed a bill forbidding scientists from advising the EPA on their own research
  47. Justifying War: “Just” Wars  

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Renewables Now Cheaper Than Fossil Fuels in Australia

Renewables Now Cheaper Than Fossil Fuels in Australia,” Environmental News Network, 8 January 2014

A study by Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) in Australia has discovered that renewable energy is cheaper to produce than the old conventional fossil fuel sources, and that is without the subsidies.
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US Pentagon has spent $8 Trillion to Guard Gulf Oil

Juan Cole, “Solar would be Cheaper: US Pentagon has spent $8 Trillion to Guard Gulf Oil,” informed Comment, 8 December 2013

It has cost the United States $8 trillion to provide military security in the Gulf since 1976. According to Roger Stern, a Princeton economist, the US has spent as much on Gulf security as it spent on the entire Cold War with the Soviet Union! In recent years through 2010 it has been $400 billion a year, though the US withdrawal from Iraq at the end of 2011 and the gradual withdrawal from Afghanistan this year and next presumably means that the figure is substantially reduced. Still, we have bases in Kuwait, Qatar and elsewhere, and a Naval HQ in Bahrain, none of which is cheap. If it were $200 billion a year, that is a fair chunk of the budget deficit the Republican Party keeps complaining about. And if we could get that $8 trillion back, it would pay down half of the national debt. …
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Solar Energy Perspectives

Solar Energy Perspectives,” International Energy Agency‌, 2011

In 90 minutes, enough sunlight strikes the earth to provide the entire planet’s energy needs for one year. While solar energy is abundant, it represents a tiny fraction of the world’s current energy mix. But this is changing rapidly and is being driven by global action to improve energy access and supply security, and to mitigate climate change.

Download the report here.

Solar Could Help Australia Phase Out Coal Power by 2040

Solar Could Help Australia Phase Out Coal Power by 2040,” Solar Energy News, July 26 2013

Australia could phase out almost all its fossil-fuel sourced electricity by 2040 if it doubled the current rate of take-up of solar energy and wind energy maintained its current growth pace, said Professor Ken Baldwin, director of ANU’s Energy Change Institute. …

Solar energy, currently dominated by photovoltaic cells, is adding about 1 gigawatt of capacity annually, roughly equivalent to the amount added by wind farms. If the pace of solar energy expansion doubled, starting in 2025, it would overtake fossil-fuel fired power plants by 2030 and leave only a couple of gigawatts of coal or gas power by 2040 – down from almost 40 gigawatts now. …
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