Security-led approach to climate change and complex emergencies

Dystopian preparations by the state are reflected in the corporate arena. Where we see a future climate crisis, many companies see only opportunity: oil firms looking forward to melting ice caps delivering new accessible fossil fuels; security firms touting the latest technologies to secure borders from ‘climate refugees’; or investment fund managers speculating on weather-related food prices – to name but a few. In 2012, Raytheon, one of the world’s largest defence contractors, announced “expanded business opportunities” arising from “security concerns and their possible consequences,” due to the “effects of climate change” in the form of “storms, droughts, and floods”. The rest of the defence sector has been quick to follow. Continue reading

5% Digest (week 09/03/15)

British MPs voted in favour of keeping defence spending at 2% of GDP. Just 40 MPs voted and the result carries no legal force.

Rory Stewart, Conservative MP for Penrith and the Border and chairman of the defence select committee, warned MPs that Britain could not continue to rely on the military might of America and be a “freeloader”. “This 2% is needed because the threats are real. The world is genuinely getting more dangerous,” he said.

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September Reading List

  1. How the west created the Islamic State
  2. Who’s Paying the Pro-War Pundits?
  3. The Pentagon’s $800-Billion Real Estate Problem
  4. Lefties and liberals still don’t do enough to stop wars
  5. How the super rich got richer: 10 shocking facts about inequality
  6. ISIS’s Enemy List: 10 Reasons the Islamic State Is Doomed
  7. Why the Ukraine Crisis Is the West’s Fault
  8. Democracy in the Twenty-First Century
  9. Israeli drone conference features weapons used to kill Gaza’s children
  10. New Report on Water Impacts of Shale Gas Development
  11. Behind the headlines: Fracking and water contamination
  12. Story of a War Foretold: Why we’re fighting ISIS
  13. Richard Brooks and Andrew Bousfield, 19th September 2014. Shady Arabia and the Desert Fix. Private Eye.
  14. “My childhood was not an episode from Downton Abbey”
  15. Russell Tribunal finds evidence of incitement to genocide, crimes against humanity in Gaza
  16. ‘Blood on their hands’: Glasgow activists shut down drone manufacturer
  17. Inequality is a choice: U.S. inequality in two shocking graphics
  18. Europe Tries to Stop Flow of Citizens Joining Jihad
  19. On the streets with the People’s Climate March
  20. The Great Frack Forward
  21. The Unaffordable Arsenal

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Technology, not policy, will make it easier to conduct the ‘forever war’

Micah Zenko, “The True Forever War,” 24 January 2014, Foreign Policy

Technology, not policy, will make it easier for U.S. leaders to kill people, blow things up, and disrupt computer networks around the world.

… Many correctly highlight that the AUMF does not reflect the scope of the conflict that the United States is now engaged in, and that its elasticity assures that America will remain on a war footing in perpetuity. However, those concerned with the prospects of a “forever war” should be concerned less about the irrelevant post-9/11 legislative mandate, and more about the revolutionary expansion of military assets that have been made available to the president since then. These technologies and processes that have reduced the costs and risks of using force have permanently changed how Americans conceive of military operations. As killing people, blowing things up, and disrupting computer networks will only get easier, it is worthwhile to take stock of where we are today.
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The militarization of U.S. police forces

Michael Shank and Elizabeth Beavers, “The militarization of U.S. police forces,” Reuters, 22 October 2013

Police departments in Boise and Nampa, Idaho, each acquired an MRAP, as did the force in High Springs, Florida. The offer of war-ready machinery, at practically no cost, has proven hard to resist for local police departments. Increasingly, they are looking like soldiers equipped for battle.

The growing similarity between our domestic police forces and the U.S. military is a result of the Pentagon’s 1033 Program. This allows the Defense Department to donate surplus military equipment and weapons to law enforcement agencies. In addition to the frightening presence of paramilitary weapons in American towns, the program has led to rampant fraud and abuse. …
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MoD study sets out how to sell wars to the public

Ben Quinn, “MoD study sets out how to sell wars to the public,” The Guardian, 26 September 2013

The armed forces should seek to make British involvement in future wars more palatable to the public by reducing the public profile of repatriation ceremonies for casualties, according to a Ministry of Defence unit that formulates strategy.

Other suggestions made by the MoD thinktank in a discussion paper examining how to assuage “casualty averse” public opinion include the greater use of mercenaries and unmanned vehicles, as well as the SAS and other special forces, because it says losses sustained by the elite soldiers do not have the same impact on the public and press.
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